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Intelligence does not grow in a petri dish

As there are neither agreed rules nor a generally accepted definition of intelligence, nor is there a consensus on what consequences of human or machine behaviour betokens intelligence that is either natural or artificial, it will be difficult to measure the surpassing of any point of singularity when machine intelligence matches and exceeds our own.

It may well prove to be the case that, when we think we have got there, we will have supreme exemplars on both sides of the bio/non-biological intelligence divide asking us if it any longer matters. And as our species approaches the moment of truth that may never obviously arrive, there will be a growing chorus of voices worrying if a bigger question than the definition of intelligence is the definition of the good human, when so much of what we might see as intelligence in its natural state is perverted in the course of action by the festering agency of the seven deadly sins, animated by fear and enabled by ignorance.

Given the wide range of environments within which intelligence can reveal itself, and the vast spectrum of actions and behaviours that emerge within those environments, it may be the very definition of the fool’s errand to attempt an anywhere anytime definition of intelligence itself. We can learn only so much by laboratory-based comparisons of brains and computers, for example, balancing physiological correlations in the one with mechanistic causations in the other.

Glimmerings of clarity emerge only when one intelligent agent is pitched against another in a task-oriented setting, the victory of either one being equated with some sense of intelligence superiority when all that has happened is that an explicit task orientation is better addressed when the parameters of the task can be articulated.

What appears to distinguish human intelligence in the evolutionary sense is the capability to adapt not only in the face of threats and existential fear, but in anticipation of imagined projections of all manner of dangers and terrors. We hone our intelligence in facing down multiple threats; we achieve wisdom by facing down the fear that comes with being human.

Fear is not innate to the machine but it is to us, as Franklin D Roosevelt understood. However machines progress to any singularity, humanity’s best bet lies in understanding how the conquering of fear will enhance our intelligence and our adaptive capabilities to evolve through the singularity, and beyond.

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